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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I have read up on the thread about different people's opinions on what the best way to degunk the engine is... I chose the seafoam method.

The consensus seems to be that the best delivery method for seafoam to clean the engine is through the vacuum pipe. Seeing as I am not that experienced in engine plumbing, I have no idea which pipe is the vacuum pipe into which I need to suck the liquid. A photo would be greatly appreciated!

As for different delivery methods, some have suggested through the throttle body...from my understanding, this achieves the same thing, but instead of using liquid seafoam, you use the aerosol ... am I right?

And if you have any different opinions or suggestions, please don't be shy!


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2014 NAV, 33.000km
 

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I don't think Seafoam is the correct stuff to use. There are quite a few products made specifically for what you want to do.

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Can you elaborate? When I had my Town Car, the majority of posters used this exact method. Of course that was a big old 1997 V-8, not a modern engine like the V. I have to say I did try it (on the TC) and really noticed nothing different.....
 

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OK,..

TUNS you know thats not correct.
If you have done the operation witha particular product and pics results that would be one thing. To arbitrarily claim he doesnt know what hes talking about on its face is troll-ish.

Seafoam is the most popular engine solvent. Having said that, it is rather old technology, and is well suited for non GDI engines.
Te following is considered the best option for our GDI motors.
http://www.amazon.com/CRC-05319-Intake-Valve-Cleaner/dp/B00PHNQKR2/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1464107393&sr=1-1&keywords=crc+valve+cleaner

These options have some things one should think about.
From the other forum, those that are well informed will heartily recommend anything from CRC. Many dealerships of Hyundai will also recommend their CRC based valve service.

Here is what you need to consider. Your valves ARE filfthy. They look like burnt marshmellows on a stick. The cleaning will disturb this, and piecemeal remove the debris. This leaves residue. This residue may break off at a mis opportune time and contribute to LSPI type events.

If your dealer does this and an event follows, you are covered. If you do it, you are at their mercy.

If you are like me, and are in it for the long haul, you have meth. My valves look like this NOW and every day.Forever.
2015-10-27-11-36-51.jpg

I see you are in Canada, don't know if you can even source methanol up there. Have fun deciding.

No one has ever done a DIY before and after valve service,...maybe YOU should do this OP??

Here is some additonal reading for you to make up your mind.
[h=1]Intake valves after 25,000 miles[/h]
 

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You don't know what you're talking about either.

A piece of carbon breaking off won't contribute to an LSPI event. It'll just get burnt and thrown out the exhaust. LSPI is caused from lean popping which happens when there is not enough fuel in the cylinder and the pressure from the cylinder compressing is enough to burn whatever fuel happens to be in there. It's a premature detonation and it's not good. This is caused by sh*t tunes like the Tork one you cram down peoples throat and the fantastic OEM tune that runs lean from the factory for those mpg's
 

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You don't know what you're talking about either.

A piece of carbon breaking off won't contribute to an LSPI event. It'll just get burnt and thrown out the exhaust. LSPI is caused from lean popping which happens when there is not enough fuel in the cylinder and the pressure from the cylinder compressing is enough to burn whatever fuel happens to be in there. It's a premature detonation and it's not good. This is caused by sh*t tunes like the Tork one you cram down peoples throat and the fantastic OEM tune that runs lean from the factory for those mpg's
WOW, brother,..so hostile.

The LSPI contribution idea comes from buddies of yours from the other forum like X. Not I,..I just gave the OP a complete and objective answer sir.(*Even though I don't subscribe to this theory). Its called being truly objective. Its also why I included the entire thread for him to read and come to his own conclusion.

Discussion is one thing, your just being combative now dude. Its OK. My skin is quite thick.

(Here's where Navy seal should chime in and say,"TUNS" he didnt mention TORK.)

Your premise is incomplete, any carbon whether in the cylinder itself, on a plug, or introduced can cause a hot spot which can cotribute to the pre det. Thats not to discount everything you said, beyond the incoherent hate speech.
 

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Claiming I'm a troll when I'm not though? CRC is a great product, I agree. I use it myself... but to say "Oh its the best for our GDI" is kind of out there, like most of your posts. You ask me for pictures of before and after seafoam, which I don't have much like you don't have pictures of before and after CRC. I've used both seafoam and CRC and from my personal judgement and how the car ran after using both, I'd say that the seafoam actually does a better job. I just happen to have 4 bottles of CRC left because they were on sale.

Then you go on to say that the carbon breaking off could contribute to LSPI events. I'm not saying you buy into the theory, but if you did, that statement would be incorrect.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OK!!! Wow. I didn't think my post would get everyone's PMS raging.

I did my Seafoam. I found the vacuum tube that plugs from the PCV to the throttle body. I don't have a borescope to go and take photos, and I sincerely don't feel like removing the valve cover just to see if my one year old car that does 90% highway miles needs a complete engine overhaul.
My intent was more of a preventative maintenance, more than getting it back to brand new. I'm well conscious that some of you are fanatic about keeping the car cleaner than factory, but my car is not a collector's piece. It's a means to get me from home to work and to have fun on the weekend when I feel like spending time in the sunshine and my lawn is already cut.

From what I can gather with the Seafoam treatment : maybe it's the placebo effect or maybe it really is better, but there seems to be no more sluggishness in the very low RPMs in second gear. Call me crazy, call me lazy, hell call me Suzan and paint me orange ... This is my 0.02$

And for those who want to keep arguing, go ahead, but I'm not coming back to this thread! All I wanted was someone to indicate to me what hose to use, and maybe pitch in their own personal experience at regular maintenance. It turns out all I got was p*ssy fighting and namecalling. Thanks.
 

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Claiming I'm a troll when I'm not though? CRC is a great product, I agree. I use it myself... but to say "Oh its the best for our GDI" is kind of out there, like most of your posts. You ask me for pictures of before and after seafoam, which I don't have much like you don't have pictures of before and after CRC. I've used both seafoam and CRC and from my personal judgement and how the car ran after using both, I'd say that the seafoam actually does a better job. I just happen to have 4 bottles of CRC left because they were on sale.

Then you go on to say that the carbon breaking off could contribute to LSPI events. I'm not saying you buy into the theory, but if you did, that statement would be incorrect.
TUNS I specified its wasnt my conclusion or opinion, but a consensus from guys using on the other forum. Thats all.

I did not call you a troll, I merely stated the abrupt dis counting of Ricks answer with out further proof or argument was troll-ISH.
 

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OK!!! Wow. I didn't think my post would get everyone's PMS raging.

I did my Seafoam. I found the vacuum tube that plugs from the PCV to the throttle body. I don't have a borescope to go and take photos, and I sincerely don't feel like removing the valve cover just to see if my one year old car that does 90% highway miles needs a complete engine overhaul.
My intent was more of a preventative maintenance, more than getting it back to brand new. I'm well conscious that some of you are fanatic about keeping the car cleaner than factory, but my car is not a collector's piece. It's a means to get me from home to work and to have fun on the weekend when I feel like spending time in the sunshine and my lawn is already cut.

From what I can gather with the Seafoam treatment : maybe it's the placebo effect or maybe it really is better, but there seems to be no more sluggishness in the very low RPMs in second gear. Call me crazy, call me lazy, hell call me Suzan and paint me orange ... This is my 0.02$

And for those who want to keep arguing, go ahead, but I'm not coming back to this thread! All I wanted was someone to indicate to me what hose to use, and maybe pitch in their own personal experience at regular maintenance. It turns out all I got was p*ssy fighting and namecalling. Thanks.
You can't see the valves by taking off the valve cover. You have to take off the intake manifold.
 
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