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Discussion Starter #1
I asked this question on the GDI Engine Introduction Thread and have gotten no response. I asked the Service Manager at a dealership I was visiting and he thought that this engine had iron sleeves, but the Introduction Thread videos do not indicate this. I'm concerned about cylinder wear over the 150,000-200,000 miles I would expect to drive a new V. If not, is there some new coating or process they use to get good engine life? For those not familiar with this, iron cylinder walls are harder than aluminum and hold an oil film that minimizes wear, whereas aluminum cylinder walls (remember the Chevy Vega) do not have a good record for longevity. Anyone know for sure? I expect to buy a V in 2-3 weeks.
 

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I'm pretty certain the V has a coated aluminum alloy sleeve, (similar to nicasil) not iron for the cylinder bores. Technology has come a LONG WAY since the Chevy Vega.
 

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After several hours of online research, I am convinced that the 1.6 Gamma engine does NOT have iron sleeves.

When describing worldwide intros of the 1.8 Nu engine in the Elantra and the 1.6 Gamma engine in the Veloster, Hyundai always hypes the improved tech of the Nu engine's cast iron cylinder sleeves. I can find no mention, i.e. total silence, of iron sleeves in any description of the Gamma engine from any worldwide source.
 

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although hyundai seems consistent with there technologys on all there engines. and if theres a turbo gamma I wouldnt be surprised that the sleeves are iron. In any way Im not bothered if they are aluminium, BMW has been doing engines like this for years and they seem fine. Also, in 10 years scrap yards will be full of these engines and they should be cheap to!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm pretty certain the V has a coated aluminum alloy sleeve, (similar to nicasil) not iron for the cylinder bores. Technology has come a LONG WAY since the Chevy Vega.
I have a long memory. I guess there are advantages in fit tolerances to having aluminum cylinders and pistons, since they expand at the same rate as they warm up, and the pistons have a silicon nitride, or similar coating, but they go up and down a lot of times over the course of a couple hundred thousand miles.

I have another question that is not relevant to this thread. Why would perfectly competent Korean engineers design an air intake system that can be replaced by a $70 add on to get both better gas mileage and power with a better engine sound?
 

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I have another question that is not relevant to this thread. Why would perfectly competent Korean engineers design an air intake system that can be replaced by a $70 add on to get both better gas mileage and power with a better engine sound?
Maybe because it only costs them $15 per unit to produce it?
 

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What ad-on, an intake? Noise concerns, potential water ingestion, etc. Some companies, Hyundai being on of them, do sell factory installed intakes for some of their cars.
 

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I have another question that is not relevant to this thread. Why would perfectly competent Korean engineers design an air intake system that can be replaced by a $70 add on to get both better gas mileage and power with a better engine sound?
That's not really one of the criteria most drivers care about.
 

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I'm pretty certain the V has a coated aluminum alloy sleeve, (similar to nicasil) not iron for the cylinder bores. Technology has come a LONG WAY since the Chevy Vega.
That was an engine I never could figure-out the "WHY, GM?" of it.

Any of it.

Crummy, thin-ass chrome plating on the aluminium cylinder-walls with cast-iron rings, a cast-iron crank and rods (not even nodular), and a CAST IRON SOHC CYLINDER-HEAD.... (and it wasn't even a "cross-flow"!).

I'll not even start on the rust-issues of the body (as the Vega got a good head-start on THAT issue before it was unloaded from the transporter.....)

My Dad went through a succession of engines on three of those cars, until he finally caved and bought a Ford Mustang II (not much of an "upgrade", but at least the engine didn't blow up when my Mom drove it).

When Dad was killed, I scrapped the Vega GT-Wagon Sport that had been parked in his field for 20-odd years (along with about 20 other cars). I should have tried to sell some of them on ebay (someone probably would have bought it and stuffed a SBC in it!), but I just wanted "through" with the whole experience, and so did my bro and sis.

Hindsight: 20/20.
 

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There are many criteria ALL vehicles manufacturer's must adhere to these days. Noise pollution as they call it is one of them. So they go out of their way to ensure they are within the decibel ratings the governments mandate for them. Typically this creates an un-maximized intake system with many convolutions and restrictions in it to meet these db criteria. And as was mentioned, most consumers don't give a [email protected]$$ what their econo-box sounds like. On a global whole, there are very few of all production vehicles that get modded.
 

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And though this is not the 1.6 I'd believe the turbo set up is pretty much the same.



Sent from my Autoguide iPhone app
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the input. My fears of Aluminum cylinders wearing out in a few years are allayed. And the intake replacement for sound and pep improvement is now more likely. Replacing part of a perfectly good exhaust system - not so much. Plasti-dip to flat black the wheels, body color paint on the calipers, and vinyl to emphasize the side lines should really make my sood-to-be V a hot ride for a 64 yr old kid.
 

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The problem with the aluminum blocks that don't have sleeves are once there's an issue it's usually a one part number fix....

It's usually accompanied with nomenclature like "long block"

:p
 

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I'm pretty certain the V has a coated aluminum alloy sleeve, (similar to nicasil) not iron for the cylinder bores. Technology has come a LONG WAY since the Chevy Vega.
We had a '74 Vega. My dad sold it in 1989 to a friend, it still ran and drove fine. It had about 180,000 miles on it, and I think the only work he had done to it was a valve job and replacing the rear main seal. (Aside from typical consumables such as breaks, clutch, etc.)

That car is why I have driven mainly automatics. When I was of driving age in the early-mid '80s I had my choice: Stick-shift I-4 '74 Chevy Vega or a '77 Buick Regal w/350ci motor (with some mods done to it, including intake, carb, headers, and exhaust) with the TH350 + Posi rear. What 16 year old wouldn't pick the one that would lay down nice solid black lines? :p
 

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Funny thing is my very first car was an '83 Chevette. My brother's first car was a '74 Vega. His was the 2.3 dogomatic and mine was the 1.6 4 on the floor. We were within .1 second in the quarter mile which was in the mid-20 second range, lol. He ended up having some issues with it and ended up getting a Cosworth Vega, what a TOTALLY different car that was! That car seriously ripped back in the late 80's for a 4-banger. Then he went on to a Monza Spyder with a stoopidly built 350 running low 12's on BFG Radial T/A's. The THM 350 in that had a reverse valve-body in it, sick stuff back in the day.
 

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I asked this question on the GDI Engine Introduction Thread and have gotten no response. I asked the Service Manager at a dealership I was visiting and he thought that this engine had iron sleeves, but the Introduction Thread videos do not indicate this. I'm concerned about cylinder wear over the 150,000-200,000 miles I would expect to drive a new V. If not, is there some new coating or process they use to get good engine life? For those not familiar with this, iron cylinder walls are harder than aluminum and hold an oil film that minimizes wear, whereas aluminum cylinder walls (remember the Chevy Vega) do not have a good record for longevity. Anyone know for sure? I expect to buy a V in 2-3 weeks.
The Vega had the “Iron Duke” engine, it was a cast iron block. We all know Diesel engines run sleeves for many reasons, and they wouldn’t do it unless there was significant benefits. Personally, since you CAN sleeve the engine, I’m going to do it cause the predet blew out the compression ring. I’ll let y’all know what’s up with the block when I take it apart. Thanks, Dan
 

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The Vega had the “Iron Duke” engine, it was a cast iron block. We all know Diesel engines run sleeves for many reasons, and they wouldn’t do it unless there was significant benefits. Personally, since you CAN sleeve the engine, I’m going to do it cause the predet blew out the compression ring. I’ll let y’all know what’s up with the block when I take it apart. Thanks, Dan
OMG there is so much wrong here, I don't know where to begin.

First, you are replying to a post and thread that was made 8 years ago. Please look at post dates before you reply.

Second, the Vega did not have the "Iron Duke". The Iron Duke was the 2.5L (151ci) 2500 Pontiac engine used from 1977 thru 1993. The Vega used the 2.3L (139.6ci) 2300 engine which had an ALUMINUM block with steel crank, maincaps and head (that's the reason they failed). It was used from 1971 thru 1977. The Iron Duke replaced the 2.3L engine used in the Vega.

Please get your facts straight.
 
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