NEWS
 

  1. Welcome to Veloster Forum: Hyundai Veloster / Veloster Turbo Forums General discussion forum for Hyundai Veloster

     
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 20 of 20
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By GreyGhost12
  • 1 Post By sn4cktime

Thread: Tire Pressure

  1. #1
    Member Skitzo.d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Columbia CT
    Posts
    78

    Tire Pressure

    What is everyone running in their 18" tires? I've never had such low profile tires before. It was 20 degrees out the other morning and I got a low pressure light. I drove it a few miles hoping they were just needed to warm up, but there was 28 psi in them so I put them to 38 psi. I'm used to trucks and such so I was at a loss as to what to set them at.

    thoughts?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    Hyundai Veloster
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Senior Member tidybowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    1,395
    tire pressure is on the drivers side door jamb. im pretty sure every car has this. 32psi for the Velsoter

  4. #3
    Senior Member GreyGhost12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northeastern NY
    Posts
    2,763
    +1 with use the info on he driver's door jamb as a baseline. If you feel like playing with the pressures you can up them a little but I personally wouldn't go too much. I typically run 2-3 psi more in the fronts than rears. But there is a lot of personal preferences with tire pressures. Mine is 36 front, 33 rear and me likes.
    lionrohrs likes this.

  5. #4
    Senior Member 1.6 T-GDI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    2,552
    Don't tires usually have a max PSI labeled on the sidewall? The ones I have do, and I usually fill them up to about 5 PSI below that number while cold despite whatever the recommended vehicle PSI is.
    2013 Veloster Turbo | Matte Gray | Ultimate Package

  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW (aka Pacific Wonderland)
    Posts
    1,720
    Quote Originally Posted by 1.6 T-GDI View Post
    Don't tires usually have a max PSI labeled on the sidewall? The ones I have do, and I usually fill them up to about 5 PSI below that number while cold despite whatever the recommended vehicle PSI is.
    The PSI number on the tire's sidewall is the tire manufacturer's max permissible pressure related to the tire's load rating. Since the tire may be installed on many differing vehicles varying in weight and other factors, the sidewall number is not intended to be used as a guide to a specific vehicle's recommended tire pressure. The vehicle manufacturer's cold tire pressue recommendations on the door label (and in the OM) are the correct pressures for the car, not what is stated on the sidewall.

  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
    The PSI number on the tire's sidewall is the tire manufacturer's max permissible pressure related to the tire's load rating. Since the tire may be installed on many differing vehicles varying in weight and other factors, the sidewall number is not intended to be used as a guide to a specific vehicle's recommended tire pressure. The vehicle manufacturer's cold tire pressue recommendations on the door label (and in the OM) are the correct pressures for the car, not what is stated on the sidewall.
    ^^THIS^^

    Just Tires declined to honor my tire warranty because i had been keeping the tire pressure the same as what was listed on the sidewall rather than the door jam on my old focus

  8. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    91
    Quote Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
    The PSI number on the tire's sidewall is the tire manufacturer's max permissible pressure related to the tire's load rating. Since the tire may be installed on many differing vehicles varying in weight and other factors, the sidewall number is not intended to be used as a guide to a specific vehicle's recommended tire pressure. The vehicle manufacturer's cold tire pressue recommendations on the door label (and in the OM) are the correct pressures for the car, not what is stated on the sidewall.
    Good to know.

  9. #8
    Senior Member only1db's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Stroudsburg Area, pa
    Posts
    3,324
    yes...the only time you need to add air is if your adding wight to the car...like your going to pick up something really heavy from ikea. haha

    other than that...and maybe scca days where you will play with the pressures to yeild better traction (this is usually a combination of down for the front and higher in the rear)

    the manufactures pressure ratings are based on max contact patch while giving the best mpg...can that be adjusted...most definitely but i just usually just set mine to 32psi and be done.
    Silver Certified Hyundai tech turned Sonographer

    AND blogger? Check it out! All Things Hyundai.
    http://allthingshyundai.blogspot.com/

    "Yes yes, you are a well informed man, but this is just confirmation of your genius! " Haptic
    QFTMFT!!!

  10. #9
    Senior Member miata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    593
    I usually pump up to 33-35 psi at home when cold. When I autocross, I pump up to 40 psi but the tire still has rub mark on the shoulder more than optimal level - passed the triangle.
    2006 Miata

    Sold: 2012 Yellow Veloster Style & Tech. Manual transmission. Born on 11/18/11. Purchased 2/4/12. Magnaflow 11224 +10414+ dual tip.


  11. #10
    Member Skitzo.d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Columbia CT
    Posts
    78
    Awesome. thanks for the responses. I'll check them at home while cold and start with 32.

  12. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    18
    I realize this is old, but I recently filled up my first tank on my Veloster Turbo, and I almost always check tire pressure while my tank's filling... I noticed they were WAY high, maxing out my pen PSI guage which tops out at 48 psi... I'm a little amazed the dealership filled them to this... That seems quite dangerous. As a general guideline I fill my tires to 32-36psi. I bled them down to 36psi, and after seeing this thread, that's about right. That's what I kept them at on my 2012 Veloster.

  13. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW (aka Pacific Wonderland)
    Posts
    1,720
    The high pressure is a factory fill to facilitate shipping. The dealer is supposed to reduce the pressure during delivery prep, but apparently it gets overlooked by some.

  14. #13
    MTD
    MTD is offline
    Senior Member MTD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    ON, CAN
    Posts
    3,913
    That along with the "mode" switch seem to be the 2 most common things skipped or forgotten during the PDI.
    '13 VT

  15. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    V purchased 11/2011 Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
    Posts
    622
    Additionally, in cold climates tire pressure drops 1# per 10 degree in temp drop, so checking tire pressures more often in cold climates is advised. Unless you have the nitrogen fill which is not subject to the temp change but you have to pay for that "gas", It is more stable than plain ole air but tire stores/dealers usually charge for that luxury.
    As stated the tire pressures for optimum use on the V is listed on drivers door jamb label as with most vehicles.

    Last edited by RayT2; 02-12-2013 at 04:28 PM.
    Ray T

  16. #15
    Senior Member NEVL666's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    2,323
    Quote Originally Posted by MTD View Post
    That along with the "mode" switch seem to be the 2 most common things skipped or forgotten during the PDI.
    OK, I'll bite .. what's the 'mode' switch?
    2013 - Veloster Turbo - Century White - Black Interior/Grey Accents - A/T
    Piercemotorsports VT-One series strutbrace
    Piercemotorsports Rear Torsion Bar
    Solo-Performance 3" Cat-Back + Flowmaster Tips
    K&N Typhoon Intake + Drycharger Cover
    Just call me Nevil the Devil

  17. #16
    Senior Member sn4cktime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    119
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by RayT2 View Post
    ...Unless you have the nitrogen fill which is not subject to the temp change...
    Untrue. It, like any other gas that's compressible to a liquid-state, DOES reduce in volume, just not quite as much as general atmosphere. Which keep in mind is still MOSTLY nitrogen. Race cars only started using nitrogen so that when tires blew up in a fire they would be filled up with a fairly inert and cheaply compressible gas with no oxidizing O2. Nitrogen like CO2, decompresses to atmospheric pressure very well at both SUPER high pressures and flow rates, making them very ideal tire filling gasses. Nitrogen tends to decompress "drier" so it's generally the gas of choice. The current fad of paying for nitrogen filled tires has subsequently jacked the prices of this once cheap gas through the roof. When I used to go wheeling in my jeep I used a tank of CO2 to fill my four 12.5x35" tires at the same time from 5 to 30 running PSI in a 30 second or less blast (equivalent to about 10-15 car sized tires).

    So, to summarize my rant. Save your money, use everyday compressed air. If its an industrial unit with an air drier that's all the better, but entirely not required.

    *mic drop*
    dianebrat likes this.
    Marathon Blue Veloster Turbo A/T

  18. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    V purchased 11/2011 Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
    Posts
    622
    Quote Originally Posted by sn4cktime View Post
    Untrue. It, like any other gas that's compressible to a liquid-state, DOES reduce in volume, just not quite as much as general atmosphere. Which keep in mind is still MOSTLY nitrogen. Race cars only started using nitrogen so that when tires blew up in a fire they would be filled up with a fairly inert and cheaply compressible gas with no oxidizing O2. Nitrogen like CO2, decompresses to atmospheric pressure very well at both SUPER high pressures and flow rates, making them very ideal tire filling gasses. Nitrogen tends to decompress "drier" so it's generally the gas of choice. The current fad of paying for nitrogen filled tires has subsequently jacked the prices of this once cheap gas through the roof. When I used to go wheeling in my jeep I used a tank of CO2 to fill my four 12.5x35" tires at the same time from 5 to 30 running PSI in a 30 second or less blast (equivalent to about 10-15 car sized tires).

    So, to summarize my rant. Save your money, use everyday compressed air. If its an industrial unit with an air drier that's all the better, but entirely not required.

    *mic drop*
    Amazing the line I was given when questioning why I should pay for a nitrogen fill when I was buying new tires. To paraphrase; I thought I was buying a horse instead I got horse manure......
    Thanks for the real facts behind the nitrogen use for tires.

    Ray T

  19. #18
    Super Moderator RPW00Mirage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Central MA
    Posts
    3,389
    Quote Originally Posted by Who's In Front View Post
    OK, I'll bite .. what's the 'mode' switch?
    the mode switch turns all of the electrical toys on in the car after shipping.
    2012 Boston Red Veloster NA Base Manual BTRcc tuned 167whp / 138wtq SOLD!

    2014 Vitamin-C Veloster Turbo Base Manual

  20. #19
    Senior Member sn4cktime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    119
    Blog Entries
    1
    No prob. I really try to not go off every time I see nitrogen filled tires come up; it just it bugs me SO much. It's such a scam.

    One of my GF's friends mentioned they had N filled tires and she gave me the "hand squeeze". As in, she knew I was going to start, and that I just shouldn't....
    Marathon Blue Veloster Turbo A/T

  21. #20
    Senior Member AdelaideSRT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    336
    The one good reason for nitrogen tyres, if you have someone who just won't look after their own tyre pressures, is that Bob Jane in Australia will check and top up nitrogen filled tyres if you just pull into the forecourt... Here in Australia you'll go thousands of kilometers before you find a 'service' station that will check your pressures for you.

    Now, my wife's car has run flats AND a TPMS - I no longer have to run her car out to check the pressure for her, and won't need to get nitrogen when we put Yokohamas on it when she's worn the original rubber out

    Mind you, she IS getting better at 'cars' - she's worked out how to use the diesel pump and everything... She loves her new toy, too


    Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
    Manual Veloster SR Turbo in Marmalade

  22. Remove Advertisements
    Hyundai Veloster
    Advertisements
     

Similar Threads

  1. Tire Pressure Monitoring System (complete explanation on pg 2)
    By FeedbakBWR in forum Hyundai Veloster Wheels, Tires and Brakes
    Replies: 80
    Last Post: 10-17-2014, 04:46 PM
  2. Tire pressure: What pressure do you run?
    By Veloster-guy in forum Hyundai Veloster Wheels, Tires and Brakes
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 04-07-2014, 08:45 PM
  3. Experience with 17" Nexens tire pressure so far?
    By malagabee in forum Hyundai Veloster Wheels, Tires and Brakes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-10-2011, 10:10 PM
  4. Tire Pressure Sensor Question?
    By Pilgrim in forum Veloster.org Suggestions and Help
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-06-2011, 03:09 PM
  5. Tire Pressure Monitoring System (complete explanation on pg 2)
    By FeedbakBWR in forum Hyundai Veloster Engine and Transmission
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-05-2011, 10:28 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.1.2